Tuesday, December 16, 2014

CAN INDIA BECOME A SUPERPOWER?

 PD (Govt.Origin)
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 India is the world's largest democratic nation. Its economy is growing and if you are a regular follower of our coverage of the Indian navy you know while still growing and reforming it is impressive. Can India become a superpower? We present three videos we recently found that explore this concept. The first is an exploration of India's history, borders, geography, government and economy and political problems. In just 13 minutes you will have a background on India that would normally take you weeks of reading. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXZ4pRhY-kU

 The second video examines the pertinent question, can India become a superpower? This video which lasts only a little over 3 minutes looks at innovative entrepreneurial activity among India's young new college graduates and responds in the affirmative predicting that India will be an economic superpower in ten years.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkH3Qcqgr9M


 INS Vikrant (R11) with a Sea King helicopter during Indo-Pakistani war of 1971 (Photo Indian Navy) 

Finally, India as a Superpower an ABC Documentary:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNnE1MdxoS0  which pretty much views India as an already emerging superpower and a rather likable one.

 What are our thoughts on India as a Super Power?  We have cheered the rise of Indian naval power since our start up as a blog because the Indian Ocean needs a guardian and Britain passed the baton to the U.S. which with its global taxing all of its ever shrinking naval resources is hard pressed for the role. So why not the Navy of a large, committed democracy? As pointed out in the ABC documentary economically we are profitably allied with India at the corporate level even if India remains officially a "non aligned nation."  The U.S. and India appear to be on parallel and complimentary courses. We see no reason not to encourage that evolution. But in doing so we must respect India's choices, treat them as an equal and not presume that we are the tutors. We are fellow travelers and students on the road to wide spread prosperity and security. We both face dangers within and without, let,s never be a danger to each other.

 Of course we have to admit that we spend at least half the year in Louisiana where they raise Brahman Cattle for their heat resistance, the popular governor is a first generation Indian American, the the Flagship University has a Tiger for its mascot, and the climate and terrain resemble parts of southern India and the population is just as diverse but convinced that there is no better place on earth. People from especially South Louisiana seems predisposed towards understanding India and liking the place and people. Go Tigers!

Johnas Presbyter, Editor
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